Category Archives: 1803

Back Figure of a Yakutan Girl, Sakha traditional folk dress.

Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

Back Figure of a Yakutan Girl.

Back Figure of a Yakutan Girl, Sakha traditional folk dress 1803.

Front Figure of a Yakutan Girl

Une Fille Yakoute, par derrière.

THE most learned and revered of the Yakutan Aiouns, or priests, are those who can remember the names of the greatest number of divinities; but they are more indebted for the consideration they enjoy to their powers of magic, their tambour, and the oddity of their dress, than to their sacerdotal functions. Continue reading

Back Figure of a Yakut, Sakha in his Hunting Dress.

Yakut in his Hunting Dress. Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

Back Figure of a Yakut in his Hunting Dress.

Back Figure of a Yakut, Sakha in his Hunting Dress 1803.

Front of of a Yakut, Sakha in his Hunting Dress.

Un Yakout en Habit de Chasse, par derriére.

ALTHOUGH the Yakuti are condemned to a wandering state of existence, they rarely change their winter habitations: in autumn they return to the same huts which they occupied during the preceding winter. Continue reading

A Yakutan Girl, Sakha in traditional folk dress 1803.

A Female Yakut garb. Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

A Yakutan Girl.

A Yakutan Girl, Sakha in traditional folk dress 1803.

Back figure of a Yakutan Girl.

Une Fille Yakoute.

SHAMANISM is the only religion known to the Yakuti. They acknowledge two superior beings; both of them nearly equal in power, the one good, and the other bad. Inferior deities, emanating from their substance, participate also of their qualities. They marry, and have children of both sexes; who, in their turn, produce other divinities, inhabiting the air, the earth, and the waters. Continue reading

A Female Yakut in traditional folk dress 1803.

A Female Yakut garb. Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

A Female Yakut.

 

A Female Yakut, Sakha in traditional folk dress 1803.

Sakha (Yakutia) Republic.

Une Femme Yakoute.

THE dress of the Yakutan women resembles that of the man; but, in general, their garments are better worked, and more loaded with ornaments. When they wish to appear in their best attire, they throw over their usual dress a waistcoat without sleeves, about six inches shorter than their under garment. Continue reading

An armed Turcoman, with his Bow 1803.

Armed Turcoman costume. Ottoman empire warrior. Asian knight.

A Turcoman, with his Bow.

An armed Turcoman, with his Bow 1803

Un Turcoman armé de son Arc, &c. 

THE Trukhmenes, or Turcomans, says Professor Pallas, are a wealthy, well-formed, lively people, and more attached to ornamental dress than any other tribe of the Steppes. Continue reading

A Tschutzkian Woman costume 1803.

Tchutzki, Tschutzkian Woman costume. Traditional Russian national folk dress.

A Tschutzkian Woman.

A Tschutzkian Woman costume 1803.

Une Femme Tschoutzkienne.

THE Tschutzki are a people strongly resembling the wandering Koriaks. They dress in the same manner, speak the same language, spring from the same stock, and have nearly the same manners and customs; but they are even more ferocious. Continue reading

Traditional Finland costume. A Female Tschermiss.

Traditional Finland costume. A Female Tschermiss. Traditional Russian national costume

A Female Tschermiss.

Traditional Finland costume. A Female Tschermiss.

Une Tschérémisse.

THE Tschermiss are of Finland origin, and have their settlements in the governments of Kazan and Niznei-Novgorod, on both sides of the Volga, but chiefly along the left bank of this river; whence they extend as far as Perm. Continue reading

A Female Tatar of Tomsk.

 

Female Tartar of Tomsk folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

A Female Tartar of Tomsk.

A Female Tartar of Tomsk.

Une Tatare de Tomsk.

THE Tartars of Tomski are distinct from the tribe which occupies the environs of the town of Tomsk; for the latter, as well as the Tartars of Tobolsk and Tarn, are a Boukarian colony. Continue reading

A Tatar Woman of Kusnezk.

Tatar costume. Teleutan Kusnezk folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

A Tartar Woman of Kusnezk

A Tatar Woman of Kusnezk 1803.

Une Femme Tatare de Kousnetzk, par derrière.

THE Teleutans, or Telengoutes, known by both appellations, apparently derive their name from the Telengout lake, near the Ob. Although they are not a nation purely Kalmuc, the Russians call them White Kalmucs either from their coining from the White Mountains, from their being of a lighter complexion than the other wandering nations, or, because the word ” white ” sometimes signifies free. Continue reading