Category Archives: 20th Century

Fantasy costume of Dione by Léon Bakst

Art deco costume design. Léon Bakst. Mother of Venus

Fantasy costume design of the mother of Venus, by Léon Bakst.

Fantasy costume of Dione, Mother of Venus by Léon Bakst

‘Fantaisie Sur Le Costume Moderne, Dioné’, By Léon Bakst 1914. 

Dione is in Greek mythology, the mother of Aphrodite. In Roman mythology, she is equated with Venus. Or Dione (Greek Διώνη) is in Greek mythology, the daughter of Atlas and the wife of Tantalus, thus the mother of Broteas, Pelops and Niobe.

Art deco, Art nouveau fashion era.

A Shahaptian chief in ceremonial costume.

Traditional Sahaptin costume. Shahaptian chief ceremonial dress. Native American tribe clothing headdress

Shahaptian chief

A Shahaptian chief in ceremonial costume.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

South African medicine man costume.

South African medicine man costume. Traditional Africa clothing

Medicine man from South Africa

South African medicine man costume.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

Three Swiss girls in traditional costumes

Switzerland traditional costumes. Swiss folk dresses. Dirndl clothing

Swiss girls

Three Swiss girls in traditional costumes.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

No masks by Kiyotoki-Shimomura

No masks. Kiyotoki-Shimomura. Hōshō Kurō Tomoharu. Chujo. Masugami. Yase-onna. Kagekiyo. Okina. Kawazu.

No masks by Kiyotoki-Shimomura

No masks by Kiyotoki-Shimomura

By the death of Kiyotoki-Shimomura on May 29th, 1922, at the age of fifty-five, not only Nippon, but the world at large, lost a master carver of noh masks, a branch of art peculiarly Japanese in spirit. On account of the important position held by his family for generations in noh drama he was given rare opportunities of studying at close hand famous masks by old masters which were very rarely permitted to be seen except when they were worn on the noh stage. Not only that, but he had had a severe yet kind criticism on his work by Hōshō Kurō Tomoharu (Japanese Noh actor. 宝生 九郎 知栄; Fukagawa-san, 1837-1917), a great authority on the Noh, which spurred him on until at last he grasped the spirit of this unique art, and was able to produce masks that could favourably be compared with those of ancient masters. Continue reading

Costume design by Marie-Louise Bruyère in 1950s.

 

Costume designs by Marie-Louise Bruyère. French Haute couture vintage fashion.

Costume design “Modèle Domino”

Costume design by French couturier Marie-Louise Bruyère.

Marie-Louise Bruyère (1918-1958), called Mme Bruyère (pronounced Broo-yair) was born in rural France, but her ambitious parents, Henri Bruyère and Jeanne Loubet, moved the family to the expanding suburbs of Paris, where they prospered.

Costume designs by Marie-Louise Bruyère. French Haute couture vintage fashion.

Costume design “Modèle Classicisme”

The sophisticated neighbourhood of Saint Gratien, which included Napoleon I’s niece, Princess Mathilde, amongst its residents, impressed the young designer who trained first with the house of Cheruit, and then Lanvin. Madame Jeanne Lanvin asked her to become Première d’Atelier de Couture. By 1928, she opened her own fashion house, Bruyère Couture, which flourished as her fame spread internationally, allowing her to open a grand salon at 22 Place Vendome in 1937. She staged two fashion shows a year, containing up to 200 different outfits in cool raffish elegance.

Costume designs by Marie-Louise Bruyère. French Haute couture vintage fashion.

Costume design “Modèle Olympic”

Each outfit was assigned a different name. By 1947 she employed 328 people. The business continued to grow in scale and reputation, but from the mid 1950s it switched to producing prêt-a-porter outfits, and its name became increasingly eclipsed.