Category Archives: New Zealand

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913

Traditional Maori Poi Dance. New Zealand folk costumess

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913.

“Poi” as an art form originated in the Māori in New Zealand. The origin of Poi itself is relatively little studied, mainly because oral traditions are known. The Ur-Poi were an invention of Maori women and consisted of two equally long branches that were connected at their ends with flax. The other ends are put into the fire and brought it to burn in order to achieve an effect in the dark. The Poi dance was originally used by the Maori women to maintain flexibility of their hands, and of the men in order to promote the necessary strength and coordination in a fight. Poi were also used as a training tool for other ancient weapons like Mere or Patu. Poi spinning is kinesthetic related to staff rotation or pen spinning, since crossing the manipulation of a rotating object to be kinetic center, stands in front of and adjacent to both sides of the body and not on throwing and catching objects. The traditional Poi game is about a thousand years old and is regarded by the descendants of the original inhabitants of New Zealand today as a cultural tradition.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Maori Carvings New Zealand 1913.

Maori Carvings New Zealand. Ornamental art.

Maori Carvings, New Zealand 1913

Maori Carvings New Zealand 1913.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Maori people of New Zealand in 1840.

Hua Hua. Traditional Maori costumes. New Zealand clothing. Oceanian people

Peoples from Hua Hua. Maori people of New Zealand

Maori people of New Zealand in 1840.

Above: Peoples from Hua Hua. Below: Maori people of New Zealand.

From the book: Natural History and pictures of the people and the different races and tribes according to the latest discoveries and most exquisite original research, edited by HR Schinz. Honeggersche Lithographic Institute, 3. Advanced ed. 1845 Zurich.

A Maori lady in full dress. Auckland New Zealand.

Maori costume. Traditional New Zealand clothing. native face tattoo

Maori woman from New Zealand

A Maori lady in full dress. Auckland New Zealand.

With greenstone ornament and club.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

A Samoan chief in full ceremonial costume.

Samoan chief ceremonial dress. Traditional Oceania native costume.

Samoan chief in ceremonial dress

A Samoan chief in full ceremonial costume.

Plaques of mother-of-pearls form the chief ornaments in the front of the head-dress, while the collar is of sperm-whale teeth. Apia, Samoa.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

Maori village New Zealand 1913.

Maori village. Indigenous people. Aotearoa New Zealand costumes

Maori village, New Zealand 1913

Maori village New Zealand.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Māori Wahine New Zealand

Māori Wahine costumes. kiwi feathers. pendent heitiki. Traditional New Zealand dress

Māori Wahine 1913

Māori Wahine, New Zealand 1913.

Māori Wahine (The Māori word for woman) with mat of kiwi feathers and pendent heitiki.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

The Ducal Haka, Rotorua. New Zealand 1913.

Māori warriors wearing piu-pius of flax, performing the Poi dance

The Ducal Haka, Rotorua. New Zealand 1913

The Ducal Haka, Rotoroa Island. New Zealand 1913.

Māori warriors wearing piu-pius of flax, and equipped as for battle performing the Poi dance, stick games and the “haka” war dance. One section wearing alternately red and white dresses, and another wearing hukareres, or blouses, of snowy-white blue sashes and piu-pius round the waist.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Maori warrior with Taiaha weapon, New Zealand

New Zealand warrior tribe. indigenous people costume. Taiaha weapons

Maori warrior with taiaha weapon, New Zealand 1913

Maori warrior with Taiaha weapon, New Zealand

The Taiaha (also called Hani) is mace and spear of New Zealand’s indigenous people, the Māori. The Taiaha was developed by the Māori as a melee weapon. Is taught in the handling Mau Rakau, the māori martial arts. The Taiaha grounds contain hardwood and is divided into three parts: arero (hammer head) with the upoko (head, shock tip) and the tinana or ate. The shaft (handle) is round in cross section. At one end it has a spear-shaped leaf (arero) and at the other end a broad impact head (ate, tinana). The spear tip is made of wood and decorated. The impact head end is wider from the middle of flat and round up to the end. This end is cut straight and is similar to a boat paddle. This end is used for pounding, to stab the other. The flip side flat and the tip or tongue (arero) are elaborately decorated with carvings, as an ornamental deposits (for eyes) are occasionally New Zealand Paua abalone snail (Haliotis iris). Below the tip of a wreath of hair is attached.  The length of the Taiaha is about 150 cm (rarely longer). There are occasional variants in which a spearhead of jade was used.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Maori meeting house, New Zealand 1913.

Maori meeting house. Traditional Maori costume. New Zealand folk dress

Maori meeting house New Zealand 1913

Maori meeting house, New Zealand 1913.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Tattooed Maori 1913, New Zealand.

Maori Warrior Tattoo. New Zealand tribal costumes. Paul Gooding

Tattooed Maori 1913

Tattooed Maori 1913, New Zealand.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.