South African medicine man costume.






South African medicine man costume. Traditional Africa clothing

Medicine man from South Africa

South African medicine man costume.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

The Bridge of Nanjing. Ancient China sceneries.






The Bridge of Nanjing. Ancient China architecture. Chinese Landscape.

The Bridge of Nanjing.

The Bridge of Nanjing.

It has been previously stated in the pages of these volumes, that Nanjing is not seated immediately on the banks of the Yang-tse-kiang, but at the distance of three miles from them, and connected with that noble river by a wide and deep canal; so considerable, indeed, is this artificial navigation, which continues parallel to the west and south walls of the city, at a trifling interval only, that the bridges thrown across it are works of much architectural pretensions. Near where the Porcelain Tower formerly stood, the largest and principal bridge of Nanjing spans the main trunk of the canal, forming a communication between an extensive suburb, and the west gate of the city. It consists of six well-turned arches of unequal width, and is altogether a scientific work, being kept down nearly to a level with the banks at either extremity. Continue reading

The Imperial Travelling Palace at the Hoo kew shan.

Ancient China landscape. The Imperial Travelling Palace. 天堂行宫(虎丘山上的宫殿)

The Imperial Travelling Palace at the Hoo kew shan

The Imperial Travelling Palace at the Hoo kew shan, Henan Province.

Jupiter descended occasionally from Olympus, and became the guest of mortals, and the king of Tartarus emerged from his gloomy hall to visit the palace of Queen Ceres, yet the mighty autocrat of the “Celestial empire” never deigns to enter any save an imperial habitation. No private palace of his humiliated mandarins’ no public inn of his enslaved subjects, is ever honoured by the imperial presence; when the court makes a tour of pleasure or policy, the retinue is lodged at “travelling palaces” erected for their reception. These occur along the great high-roads that connect the principal cities of the empire, and some of them exceed in sumptuousness, all in picturesque accompani’ ments, the much-celebrated palace and gardens of Peking. Continue reading

The Imperial Palace at Ts’ao shan.

Ancient China. The Imperial palace at Ts'ao shan. 焦山行宫.

The Imperial palace at Ts’ao shan

The Imperial Palace at Ts’ao shan.

About three miles north-east from Chin-keang-foo, the provincial capital of Jiang Nan (Chinese: 江南;), from the broad bright waters of the Yangtse keang, rise the picturesque and precipitous rocky islets called “the three hills of King-kow.” Nature has been bountiful to them in all respects, and, from immemorial time, they have also largely partaken of the smiles of their imperial rulers. Continue reading

Three Swiss girls in traditional costumes

Switzerland traditional costumes. Swiss folk dresses. Dirndl clothing

Swiss girls

Three Swiss girls in traditional costumes.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

A Syrian girl in traditional dress at a spring.

Syrian girl in traditional dress. Traditional Arabian clothing. Arab girl costume

Girl from Syria

A Syrian girl in traditional dress at a spring in 1902.

The picturesque native costume is excellently displayed in this picture.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world, by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

No masks by Kiyotoki-Shimomura

No masks. Kiyotoki-Shimomura. Hōshō Kurō Tomoharu. Chujo. Masugami. Yase-onna. Kagekiyo. Okina. Kawazu.

No masks by Kiyotoki-Shimomura

No masks by Kiyotoki-Shimomura

By the death of Kiyotoki-Shimomura on May 29th, 1922, at the age of fifty-five, not only Nippon, but the world at large, lost a master carver of noh masks, a branch of art peculiarly Japanese in spirit. On account of the important position held by his family for generations in noh drama he was given rare opportunities of studying at close hand famous masks by old masters which were very rarely permitted to be seen except when they were worn on the noh stage. Not only that, but he had had a severe yet kind criticism on his work by Hōshō Kurō Tomoharu (Japanese Noh actor. 宝生 九郎 知栄; Fukagawa-san, 1837-1917), a great authority on the Noh, which spurred him on until at last he grasped the spirit of this unique art, and was able to produce masks that could favourably be compared with those of ancient masters. Continue reading

Italian bobbin made flounce 16th century.

Italian Bobbin Lace flounce Piece. Needlepoint 16th century

Italian bobbin-made flounce 16th century.

Italian bobbin made flounce 16th century.

Twenty-two inches wide.

AND here the needle plies its busy task,
The pattern grows, the well-depicted flower,
Wrought patiently into the snowy lawn,
Unfolds its bosom, buds and leaves and sprigs,
And curling tendrils, gracefully dispersed,
Follow the nimble fingers of the fair—
A wreath that cannot fade of flowers that blow
With most success when all besides decay.”
— Cowper.

French costumes 16th century. Period of Henry III.

French costumes 16th century. nobility fashion period of Henry III. France renaissance dresses

French costumes 16th century.

French costumes 16th century. Period of Henry III.

Renaissance fashion period.

The countess Dziatynska, by birth princess Czartoryska, whose fine collection and good taste in fine arts are well known, has put to our disposition a selection of costumes engraved by Jacques Boissard in 1581. This selection, which has become extremely rare, presents a complete history of the costumes of that age. We will often profit by it: from to day we copy one of the plates with french costumes.

Modes Française. Époque de Henry III. D´Apres Jacques Boissard

Costume design by Marie-Louise Bruyère in 1950s.

 

Costume designs by Marie-Louise Bruyère. French Haute couture vintage fashion.

Costume design “Modèle Domino”

Costume design by French couturier Marie-Louise Bruyère.

Marie-Louise Bruyère (1918-1958), called Mme Bruyère (pronounced Broo-yair) was born in rural France, but her ambitious parents, Henri Bruyère and Jeanne Loubet, moved the family to the expanding suburbs of Paris, where they prospered.

Costume designs by Marie-Louise Bruyère. French Haute couture vintage fashion.

Costume design “Modèle Classicisme”

The sophisticated neighbourhood of Saint Gratien, which included Napoleon I’s niece, Princess Mathilde, amongst its residents, impressed the young designer who trained first with the house of Cheruit, and then Lanvin. Madame Jeanne Lanvin asked her to become Première d’Atelier de Couture. By 1928, she opened her own fashion house, Bruyère Couture, which flourished as her fame spread internationally, allowing her to open a grand salon at 22 Place Vendome in 1937. She staged two fashion shows a year, containing up to 200 different outfits in cool raffish elegance.

Costume designs by Marie-Louise Bruyère. French Haute couture vintage fashion.

Costume design “Modèle Olympic”

Each outfit was assigned a different name. By 1947 she employed 328 people. The business continued to grow in scale and reputation, but from the mid 1950s it switched to producing prêt-a-porter outfits, and its name became increasingly eclipsed.

A Turkish woman indoor costume. Constantinople 1902.

Turkish woman indoor costume. Traditional Ottoman empire dress

Turkish girl in indoor dress

A Turkish woman indoor costume from Constantinople, 1902.

From the book: Living Races of Mankind. A popular illustrated account of the customs, habits, pursuits, feasts, and ceremonies of the races of mankind throughout the world, by Henry Neville Hutchinson (1856-1927), John Walter Gregory and Richard Lydekke. Published by Hutchinson & Co. Paternoster Row, London 1902.

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913

Traditional Maori Poi Dance. New Zealand folk costumess

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913.

“Poi” as an art form originated in the Māori in New Zealand. The origin of Poi itself is relatively little studied, mainly because oral traditions are known. The Ur-Poi were an invention of Maori women and consisted of two equally long branches that were connected at their ends with flax. The other ends are put into the fire and brought it to burn in order to achieve an effect in the dark. The Poi dance was originally used by the Maori women to maintain flexibility of their hands, and of the men in order to promote the necessary strength and coordination in a fight. Poi were also used as a training tool for other ancient weapons like Mere or Patu. Poi spinning is kinesthetic related to staff rotation or pen spinning, since crossing the manipulation of a rotating object to be kinetic center, stands in front of and adjacent to both sides of the body and not on throwing and catching objects. The traditional Poi game is about a thousand years old and is regarded by the descendants of the original inhabitants of New Zealand today as a cultural tradition.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.