Tag Archives: French national costume

Costume of a Smuggler of Grand Bretagne

Smuggler costume of Grand Bretagne. Traditional Bretagne national costume. Bretagne Folk clothing. Ethnic dress.

Smuggler of Grand Bretagne

Costume of a Smuggler of Grand Bretagne.

From the Book: Manners, customs and costumes of all peoples of the world, based on authentic documents and and newer travel (1843) by Auguste Wahlen. (Mœurs, usages et costumes de tous les peuples du monde, d’après des documents and authentiques et les voyages des plus récents; (1843) Author: Auguste Wahlen, 1785-1850. Engrapher: François Pannemaker 1822-1900)






Civil costumes. 18th century.

German Civil costumes. 1770 to 1790.

German and French civil costumes. 1770 to 1790.

German and French civil costumes. 18th century.

1770 to 1790.
Top row left to right: German and french costume in Strasbourg. Civil costumes from Karlsruhe, Vienna, Frankfurt. Bottom row left: girl and woman in the costume of Augsburg. Right: costumes from Ludwigsburg, Munich, Black Forest peasant.

On the history of costumes. Münchener Bilderbogen. Edited by Braun and Schneider 1860.

French medieval shepherdess costume

French Medieval Gothic woman clothing. 15th century fashion. Shepherdess costume

A French shepherdess 15th century

French medieval shepherdess costume 15th century

“Modes et Costumes Historiques“. Drawing by Xavier Willemin. Edited and steel engraving by Hippolyte Louis Emile and Polidor Jean Charles Pauquet. Published by Cassell, Petter & Galpin London, 1864.

 

French Milkmaid of Bagnolet costume 1680.

France baroque costume. 17th Century clothing. Louis XIV fashion. French national costume

Milkmaid of Bagnolet 1680.

French Milkmaid of Bagnolet costume 1680.

France baroque costume. 17th Century Ancien Régime female clothing. Louis XIV fashion period.

“Modes et Costumes Historiques“. Drawing by Xavier Willemin. Edited and steel engraving by Hippolyte Louis Emile and Polidor Jean Charles Pauquet. Published by Cassell, Petter & Galpin London, 1864

Embroidery designs from France National Costumes.

Old Embroidery designs from France national costumes. Child clothing. traditional fabrics design

French embroidery designs c. 16th-19th

Embroidery designs from France National Costumes 16th to 19th century.

  • 1.2. Child’s bonnet with cloth appliqué. Ariège, France 19th century.
  • 3. Knitted child’s oversock. Brittany, France 19th century.
  • 4. 15. 17. Women’s bodices of silk and velvet embroidered with silk, gold thread and sequins, Département Ain early 19th century.
  • 5. 6. Embroidered baptismal bonnet. Brittany, France 19th century (no. 5 with gold embroidery).
  • 7. Embroidered child’s bonnet. Auvergne, France 16th century.
  • 8. Man’s waistcoat neck embroidery. Brittany, France 18th-19th century.
  • 9. Processional child’s bonnet. Brittany, France 18th century.
  • 10. Child’s fabric slipper with gold embroidery. Brittany, France 19th century.
  • 11. 13. Ornamental wooden shoes with straw weaving and wool embroidery. Brittany, France 19th century.
  • 12. Man’s waistcoat silk embroidered. Brittany, France 19th century.
  • 14. Woman’s apron embroidery. Brittany, France 18th-19th century.
  • 16. Velvet and cloth embroidery. Brittany, France 19th century.

Source: Palais Chaillot (Musée de l’Homme) Paris, France.

 

Limonadiere of Paris, 1821. Traditional French folk clothing.

French traditional national costumes. Paris female folk clothing.

Limonadiere of Paris

Limonadiere of Paris, 1821.

No vender of any article in the world makes a greater display than the Limonadiere of Paris. It is not a vulgar barrel or tin can that could satisfy the demi-sous drinker of the Grande Nation; no, it must be a neat temple blazing with Fames, whose petticoats do not hide too much; Suns of brass and Gods and Goddesses must adorn with their beau ideal the vessel containing the drink of the decrotteur and scavenger, And the farthings coming from the filthy hand of a mud piler suddenly undergo an apotheosis, and are enshrined in the beautiful crimson velvet, gold adorned pocket of the smiling Pucelle.
In the back ground is the triumphal arch of the Place Carousel.

Gallery: “Sketches Illustrative of the Manners and Costumes of France, Switzerland and Italy.“Illustrations by Richard Bridgens. Text by J.W. Polidori London. Baldwin, Cradock & Joy. 1821.

Flower girl of Paris. Traditional French folk clothing in 1821.

French traditional national costumes. Paris female folk clothing.

FLOWER GIRL OF PARIS

Flower girl of Paris.

THIS way of carrying loads is common in France. A wooden frame is secured to the shoulders, and rests upon the whole surface of the back to the hips. It is at least less painful to the sight, than our method of the knot upon the head. The French females, in defiance of their huge wooden. shoes, (within which they often wear a smaller leather one) are extremely active, and are seen moving about in every direction with baskets on their backs, plying for hire as porters, or carrying about refreshments, flowers, and trifles. The wooden shoes in a town like Paris, paved with sharp stones, must be a great saving to the poor people, who walk about from morning to night bent under their loads; they shelter their feet from being cut, and from the continual damp and dirt of the filthy streets of this capital, at the same time that they save their purses from the constant expense of new shoes.

Gallery: “Sketches Illustrative of the Manners and Costumes of France, Switzerland and Italy.“Illustrations by Richard Bridgens. Text by J.W. Polidori London. Baldwin, Cradock & Joy. 1821.

Coshois at Dieppe, Seine-Maritime. French folk costumes in 1821.

French traditional national costumes. Dieppe, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, Folk clothing

COSHOIS AT DIEPPE

Coshois at Dieppe, Seine-Maritime, 1821.

THE entry into France by Dieppe is particularly striking. Calais, where our countrymen generally land, in consequence of its former union with England, and from its having constantly been the connecting link between the two nations, has fewer peculiarities than any other French port. From these circumstances, it resembles very much an old English town, and is perhaps the worst place, at which a traveller from this island can begin his acquaintance with our rivals; for, if the change of the habits and manners of two nations is not strongly and decidedly marked, it becomes almost impossible to keep the attention so awake, as to perceive the nice gradations, by which two frontier people blend into one another. Calais, during the time of its subjection to England, was almost as much cut off from France as this country; for the desert plain or marsh on the other side, not allowing the peasantry to come within a certain distance, must have completely insulated a city, whose garrison was always afraid of some attempt at its recovery.

But Dieppe immediately presents to the traveller, as the first line of its character, the cross, seen in the print, marking to the stranger his entry upon the threshold of a nation differing in ecclesiastical as well as civil polity. When he recognizes upon the people the very dresses described in Froissart and Monstrellet, he may even imagine himself to be carried back several centuries, to the time of the Henrys and Edwards, who, with a few English knights and yeomen, swept the fields of France. The illuminations, generally published at the end of the chroniclers above mentioned, will enable him to discover the cap of Queen Isabella and the dresses of her attendant Countesses, in the various costumes of the cottage and the shop.

Gallery: “Sketches Illustrative of the Manners and Costumes of France, Switzerland and Italy.“Illustrations by Richard Bridgens. Text by J.W. Polidori London. Baldwin, Cradock & Joy. 1821.

The Pilot, 1821. Traditional Costume of Dieppe.

French traditional national costumes. Dieppe, Seine-Maritime, Haute-Normandie, Folk clothing

THE PILOT

THE PILOT. Costume of Dieppe, Seine-Maritime in 1821.

FRENCH PILOT conducting the packet to the harbour.
The packets from Brighton to Dieppe, when in sight of the harbour, are taken possession of by French pilots, who steer them into port, and linger the longer on the way, the more reluctance they perceive in the passengers to engage their boat. Their large petticoats, boots, and gay colored caps and earrings, mark them as of a different class to our own sailors, at the same time that they stamp them as a kind of messenger, sent to announce our welcome to a foreign clime.

Gallery: “Sketches Illustrative of the Manners and Costumes of France, Switzerland and Italy.“Illustrations by Richard Bridgens. Text by J.W. Polidori London. Baldwin, Cradock & Joy. 1821.