Tag Archives: French national costume

French firefighter uniform. Imperial guard.

French firefighter uniform. Traditional French National Costumes. France Ethnic garment.

French firefighter uniform 1920s

French firefighter uniform. Imperial guard.

Uniforme Sapeur du Génie de la Garde Impériale. Gallery: Manners, customs and costumes of all peoples of the world, based on authentic documents and and newer travel  by Auguste Wahlen.

Traditional Woman costumes of Lyon.

Traditional French National Costumes. Lyon folk dresses. France Ethnic garment.

Traditional Woman costumes of Lyon.

Traditional Woman costumes of Lyon c.1860.

Suite de Costumes. Costume de Femmes du peuple de Lyon. Gallery: Manners, customs and costumes of all peoples of the world, based on authentic documents and and newer travel  by Auguste Wahlen.

Traditional French Woman costumes of Caen, Calvados.

Traditional French National Costumes. Caen folk dresses. France Calvados Ethnic garment.

Woman costumes of Caen. Département Calvados

Traditional French Woman costumes of Caen, Département Calvados 1840.

Costumes Femmes environ de Caen vers 1860 Calvados. Gallery: Manners, customs and costumes of all peoples of the world, based on authentic documents and and newer travel  by Auguste Wahlen.

Costume of a Smuggler of Grand Bretagne

Smuggler costume of Grand Bretagne. Traditional Bretagne national costume. Bretagne Folk clothing. Ethnic dress.

Smuggler of Grand Bretagne

Costume of a Smuggler of Grand Bretagne.

From the Book: Manners, customs and costumes of all peoples of the world, based on authentic documents and and newer travel (1843) by Auguste Wahlen. (Mœurs, usages et costumes de tous les peuples du monde, d’après des documents and authentiques et les voyages des plus récents; (1843) Author: Auguste Wahlen, 1785-1850. Engrapher: François Pannemaker 1822-1900)

Civil costumes. 18th century.

German Civil costumes. 1770 to 1790.

German and French civil costumes. 1770 to 1790.

German and French civil costumes. 18th century.

1770 to 1790.
Top row left to right: German and french costume in Strasbourg. Civil costumes from Karlsruhe, Vienna, Frankfurt. Bottom row left: girl and woman in the costume of Augsburg. Right: costumes from Ludwigsburg, Munich, Black Forest peasant.

On the history of costumes. Münchener Bilderbogen. Edited by Braun and Schneider 1860.

French medieval shepherdess costume

French Medieval Gothic woman clothing. 15th century fashion. Shepherdess costume

A French shepherdess 15th century

French medieval shepherdess costume 15th century

“Modes et Costumes Historiques“. Drawing by Xavier Willemin. Edited and steel engraving by Hippolyte Louis Emile and Polidor Jean Charles Pauquet. Published by Cassell, Petter & Galpin London, 1864.

 

French Milkmaid of Bagnolet costume 1680.

France baroque costume. 17th Century clothing. Louis XIV fashion. French national costume

Milkmaid of Bagnolet 1680.

French Milkmaid of Bagnolet costume 1680.

France baroque costume. 17th Century Ancien Régime female clothing. Louis XIV fashion period.

“Modes et Costumes Historiques“. Drawing by Xavier Willemin. Edited and steel engraving by Hippolyte Louis Emile and Polidor Jean Charles Pauquet. Published by Cassell, Petter & Galpin London, 1864

Embroidery designs from France National Costumes.






Old Embroidery designs from France national costumes. Child clothing. traditional fabrics design

French embroidery designs c. 16th-19th

Embroidery designs from France National Costumes 16th to 19th century.

  • 1.2. Child’s bonnet with cloth appliqué. Ariège, France 19th century.
  • 3. Knitted child’s oversock. Brittany, France 19th century.
  • 4. 15. 17. Women’s bodices of silk and velvet embroidered with silk, gold thread and sequins, Département Ain early 19th century.
  • 5. 6. Embroidered baptismal bonnet. Brittany, France 19th century (no. 5 with gold embroidery).
  • 7. Embroidered child’s bonnet. Auvergne, France 16th century.
  • 8. Man’s waistcoat neck embroidery. Brittany, France 18th-19th century.
  • 9. Processional child’s bonnet. Brittany, France 18th century.
  • 10. Child’s fabric slipper with gold embroidery. Brittany, France 19th century.
  • 11. 13. Ornamental wooden shoes with straw weaving and wool embroidery. Brittany, France 19th century.
  • 12. Man’s waistcoat silk embroidered. Brittany, France 19th century.
  • 14. Woman’s apron embroidery. Brittany, France 18th-19th century.
  • 16. Velvet and cloth embroidery. Brittany, France 19th century.

Source: Palais Chaillot (Musée de l’Homme) Paris, France.

 

Paris Commune 1871. Vengereuses. Parisian communards, Federates.






Paris Commune, Vengereuses Parisian communards, Federates, Pétroleuses

Vengereuses 1871

Paris Commune 1871. Vengereuses. Parisian communards, Federates.

During the Paris Commune, the first feminist mass organization was created, the “Union des Femmes pour la défense de Paris et les soins aux blessés” (The Union of Women for the Defense of Paris and Aid to the Wounded). The organization included 160 different groups and initiatives and had 1,800 members, including Elisabeth Dmitrieff, Anna Jaclard, André Léo, as well as the leading women of the Paris International, Natalie Lemel. “We have come to the supreme moment, when we must be able to die for our Nation. No more weakness! No more uncertainty! All women to arms! All women to duty! Versailles must be wiped out!”, words by Natalie Lemel.

Vengereuses. Parisian communards, Paris Commune

The barricade at the White Place, defended by the women

The women demanded and received in such a short time the right to work and equal pay as men and fought for more rights, such as equality, legitimate and illegitimate children, and the secularization of education and health care facilities. Women like Louise Michel fought on the barricades.

Especially the most important socialists and feminists in the city refused to join the Union: Sophie Poirier, Beatrix Excoffon, Anna Jaclard, Paule Minck, Marguerite Tinayre – and especially Louise Michel and André Léo. They had all already through public lectures, organizing demonstrations, newspaper articles and pamphlets acquired a certain reputation in Paris. Their “resistance committee of Montmartre” can be interpreted as a counter initiative to the Union des Femmes. One of these women, probably Marguerite Tinayre, wrote in a letter to a friend later: “You might remember that I’ve talked to a woman meeting where I was with André Léo … and we have protested on behalf of the family against all the follies of Mme Dmitrieff.”  (Source Edith Thomas)

There were decrees concerning the retroactive adoption of overdue rent, the return of pledged goods, adopt the prohibition of night work for bakers and for the transfer of factories abandoned by their owners into public ownership. With these measures, the Paris Commune drew the hatred of the government and property owners on it. Accordingly, this social experiment was brutally put down. 30,000 people fell victim to the brutal enraged troops of the French Government within one week to the victims than those on 21 May 1871 invaded Paris.

Karl Marx saw in it “the political form at last discovered under which the economic emancipation of labor could take place.” It was for him, “essentially a working class government, the result of the struggle of the producing against the appropriating class.”

Links:
Women in the Paris Commune, Written by Christina Gridley and Carolyn Kemp
»Union des Femmes« (The largest women’s organization of the Paris Commune (1871) and the critique of libertarian feminists) in German language by Antje Schrupp.
Les Femmes dans la Commune de Paris (Woman of the Paris Commune)  in French language

 

Limonadiere of Paris, 1821. Traditional French folk clothing.






French traditional national costumes. Paris female folk clothing.

Limonadiere of Paris

Limonadiere of Paris, 1821.

No vender of any article in the world makes a greater display than the Limonadiere of Paris. It is not a vulgar barrel or tin can that could satisfy the demi-sous drinker of the Grande Nation; no, it must be a neat temple blazing with Fames, whose petticoats do not hide too much; Suns of brass and Gods and Goddesses must adorn with their beau ideal the vessel containing the drink of the decrotteur and scavenger, And the farthings coming from the filthy hand of a mud piler suddenly undergo an apotheosis, and are enshrined in the beautiful crimson velvet, gold adorned pocket of the smiling Pucelle.
In the back ground is the triumphal arch of the Place Carousel.

Gallery: “Sketches Illustrative of the Manners and Costumes of France, Switzerland and Italy.“Illustrations by Richard Bridgens. Text by J.W. Polidori London. Baldwin, Cradock & Joy. 1821.

Flower girl of Paris. Traditional French folk clothing in 1821.

French traditional national costumes. Paris female folk clothing.

FLOWER GIRL OF PARIS

Flower girl of Paris.

THIS way of carrying loads is common in France. A wooden frame is secured to the shoulders, and rests upon the whole surface of the back to the hips. It is at least less painful to the sight, than our method of the knot upon the head. The French females, in defiance of their huge wooden. shoes, (within which they often wear a smaller leather one) are extremely active, and are seen moving about in every direction with baskets on their backs, plying for hire as porters, or carrying about refreshments, flowers, and trifles. The wooden shoes in a town like Paris, paved with sharp stones, must be a great saving to the poor people, who walk about from morning to night bent under their loads; they shelter their feet from being cut, and from the continual damp and dirt of the filthy streets of this capital, at the same time that they save their purses from the constant expense of new shoes.

Gallery: “Sketches Illustrative of the Manners and Costumes of France, Switzerland and Italy.“Illustrations by Richard Bridgens. Text by J.W. Polidori London. Baldwin, Cradock & Joy. 1821.