Tag Archives: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes

18th century regency shoe fastened by a ribbon tie.

Regency shoe fashion. Georgian Era. Jane Austen style.

Shoe fastened by a ribbon tie

18th century regency shoe from the Georgian Era.

PLATE XI.

THIS shoe is fastened by a ribbon tie, instead of the overlapping straps with ornamental buckle. It is made of plain black satin, with the silk binding that is usual at the present day. The heel is neatly shaped, and not of such extravagant height as that of other shoes of a corresponding date, probably about the middle or end of the last century ; toe pointed.

Gallery: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes by T. Watson Greig 1885.

Large buckled shoe baroque fashion period.

17th century large buckled shoe. Baroque fashion period.. Vintage High Heels. Boho style. Reign of Queen Anne

Large buckled shoe worn in the reign of Queen Anne

17th century large buckled shoe. Baroque fashion period.

PLATE X.

THIS large buckled shoe was worn in the reign of Queen Anne (6 February 1665 – 1 August 1714), though, unfortunately, the name of its owner cannot be ascertained. The material is pink silk; the embroidery in silks and metallic threads is very rich, and the colours wonderfully preserved. The heel is of an immense height and breadth, and the toe so extravagantly pointed, that it must have protruded for a considerable distance beyond the foot.

Gallery: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes by T. Watson Greig 1885.

16th century tudor shoe of unknown provenance.

16th century tudor shoe. Renaissance fashion period. Vintage High Heels. Boho style.

Old shoe of unknown provenance

16th century tudor shoe. Renaissance fashion period.

PLATE IX.

FROM its appearance this shoe must be a very old one, but the date and name of its wearer cannot be discovered. It differs from many of the preceding ones by the fact that the heel, instead of being covered with the same material as the shoe, is formed of dark red leather. The old brocade is very rich in texture, and harmonious in colouring; and the flap above the instep is kept in place by a ribbon strap of a corresponding hue.

Gallery: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes by T. Watson Greig 1885.

16th century tudor high heel shoe style

16th century tudor high heel shoe style. Boho style.

Mrs Brown’s Shoe

16th century tudor shoe style. Renaissance fashion period.

PLATE VIII.

NOTHING can be ascertained about Mrs Brown, the owner of this magnificent shoe, except her name. It is made of cloth of gold; of which, although for the most part the threads of the brocade are now tarnished and blackened with age, there still remain a few inches which have withstood the ravages of time, and which serve to indicate with what brilliancy and effect the chaussure must have gleamed and sparkled when fresh from the hands of the maker. This shoe was worn with a large buckle, has an immense heel and pointed toe. It dates about the time of Queen Elizabeth (Elizabeth Tudor 1533-1603), and as it was procured in the vicinity of Kenilworth (namely at Leamington) may have figured at the revels and festivities there in its grand days.

Gallery: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes by T. Watson Greig 1885.

17th century shoe of Lady Mary Mordaunt

Shoes 17th century baroque fashion. Vintage Boho style.

Lady Mary Mordaunt’s yellow silk shoe

17th century shoe of Lady Mary Mordaunt. Baroque period.

PLATE VII.

THIS shoe also belonged to Lady Mary Mordaunt. The material is the same as that of the black one, but its bright colour and elaborate gimp trimming transforms it into a smarter and more stylish shoe. The point of the toe is so extremely sharp and elongated, that it had to be well stuffed with cotton-wool to preserve the shape.

Gallery: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes by T. Watson Greig 1885.

17th century shoe of the Duchess of Norfolk

17th century shoe baroque period. Vintage Boho style.

Lady Mary Mordaunt’s black silk shoe

17th century shoe of the Duchess of Norfolk. Baroque period.

PLATE VI.

LADY MARY MORDAUNT (Mary Howard, Duchess of Norfolk and 7th Baroness Mordaunt, British peeress c.1659–17 November 1705) was the owner of this shoe, the material of which is closely spotted black silk. The shoe is without bow, tie, or straps, and has a plain and insignificant appearance ; and its low heel makes it partake rather too much of the nature of a slipper.

Gallery: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes by T. Watson Greig 1885.

18th century rococo style shoe of Lilias.

18th century rococo style shoe. Vintage High Heels. Boho style.

Shoe of Lilias, daughter of the 12th Earl of Eglinton

18th century rococo style shoe of Lilias.

Continue reading

18th century rococo shoe fashion of Mrs Woodcock.

18th century rococo shoe fashion. Vintage High Heels. Boho style.

Mrs Woodcock’s Shoe

18th century rococo shoe fashion.

PLATE IV.

THIS shoe belonged to Anna Frances (1717-1800), wife of Walter Woodcock (1710-1794), and daughter of William Lea (1677-1741), of Halesowen Grange, Shropshire, by Frances, his wife, grand-daughter of Edward Ward, Lord Dudley, and Frances his wife, daughter of Sir William Brereton, Bart. Mrs Woodcock was consequently great-grand-daughter of Frances, Lady Dudley, and lived in the beginning of the last century. The stuff of which the shoe is composed is fine-spotted silk brocade of a yellowish colour, and ornamented with a pattern of pale blue silk embroidery above the toe. The shoe was worn with a buckle, has a small heel and round pointed toe.

Gallery: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes by T. Watson Greig 1885.

18th century rococo shoe of Countess of Portsmouth

18th century Rococo shoe of Countess of Portsmouth. Vintage High Heels. Boho style.

Countess of Portsmouth’s Shoe

Rococo shoe of Countess of Portsmouth

PLATE III.

GRACE, only daughter of Fletcher Norton (23 June 1716 – 1 January 1789), Speaker of the House of Commons, and afterwards created Lord Grantley, married John Charles, Earl of Portsmouth. The shoe was found amongst the effects of the late Lady Menzies of Menzies, who had received it from her aunt, and was worn by the Countess of Portsmouth with fancy dress. It is made of pale silk striped with blue, and is richly embroidered in steel. The form and style is apparently that of the last century (18th century).
The inside is beautifully finished, being lined with pale pink silk and white kid; while a welt of the latter, extending in height about half an inch from the sole upwards, and in length from instep to toe, thus prevented any danger of the splitting of the material of which the shoe was made. This practice has now, for some reason or other, become impossible to the modern shoemaker. The heel is very large, and the toe pointed.

Gallery: Ladies’ old-fashioned shoes by T. Watson Greig 1885.