Tag Archives: Pictures and Royal Portraits

“Pictures and Royal Portraits illustrative of English and Scottish History. From the introduction of Christianity to the Present time.” Author: Thomas Archer. Published in London, 1878 by Blackie & Son.

The Escape of Charles II. with Jane Lane.

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Charles II, Jane Lane. England history. Baroque costumes. England king

Charles as William Jackson riding with Jane Lane to Bristol. The Escape of Charles II after the battle of Worcester. By Edward Matthew Ward.

The Escape of Charles II.

Charles  and Jane Lane who sheltered King Charles II after his defeat at the Battle of Worcester, 1651.

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Sir Thomas More and his daughter Margaret

Thomas More. Margaret Roper. Tudor fashion. England history 16th century

Sir Thomas More and his daughter Margaret Roper, after a painting by John Rogers Herbert 1844

Sir Thomas More and his daughter Margaret

Margaret Roper (1505-1544), born More, was an English translator and the eldest daughter of the English humanist Sir Thomas More. She was considered one of the most educated women in Europe who was in frequent correspondence with Erasmus of Rotterdam. Her most significant achievements were her translations and her publication as an author as the first middle-class women in England.

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James Graham, 1. Marquess of Montrose.

 Marquis of Montrose. 17th century. English Civil War. Baroque costume.

The Marquis of Montrose at the Place of Execution.

The Execution of James Graham, 1. Marquess of Montrose.

James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose, (born probably in 1612 in Montrose, executed on May 21, 1650 in Edinburgh) was a Scottish nobleman who fought from 1644 to 1650  in the English Civil War in Scotland for the royal side.

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Oliver Cromwell. The Protector. History of England

Oliver Cromwell. Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland. England History. 17th century.

Oliver Cromwell. Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland.

Oliver Cromwell. The Protector.

Oliver Cromwell (born 1599 in Huntingdon, died on September 3, 1658 in Westminster) was Lord Protector of England, Scotland and Ireland during the brief Republican period of British history. In the history of the British Isles Cromwell is a controversial figure. Some historians rate him as a Kingslayer and dictator, while he applies by others as freedom hero.

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Charles the first in the guard room. 17th century.

Charles I Trial. History of England. 17th century fashion. English Civil War

Charles the first in the guard room. Charles I Insulted by Cromwell’s Soldiers by Hippolyte Delaroche. Charles I of England taunted by the victorious soldiers of Oliver Cromwell.

Charles the first in the guard room.

We feel now, as men felt very soon after the execution of Charles, that we cannot hope entirely to justify the means taken to bring about his trial and to insure the sentence. The last act of the terrible tragedy closes on a scene which has remained for more than two centuries one of the saddest and most affecting pictures in English history.

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The Battle of Marston Moor on 2 July 1644 .

Oliver Cromwell. The Battle of Marston Moor. 17th century history. England civil war.

Oliver Cromwell at the Battle of Marston Moore, July 2nd 1644. Cromwell leading a charge after being wounded in his right arm.

The Battle of Marston Moor.

The Battle of Marston Moor was held on 2 July 1644 near York and was one of the decisive battles of the English Civil War. In her the army of Parliament won his first major victory over the royalists. Northern England was thus lost for the royalists of King Charles I.

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Charles I and The English Civil War 1642-1649.

England history 17th century. Baroque costumes. England Civil War

The opening scene of the Great Civil War. Charles I erecting his standard at Nottingham August 22nd 1642.

 Charles I and The English Civil War 1642-1649.

The English Civil War was fought 1642-1649 between supporters of King Charles I of England (“Cavaliers”) and those of the English Parliament (“Roundheads”). It reflects not only the tensions between the absolutist minded King and the House of Commons, but also the contrasts between Anglicans, Puritans, Presbyterians and Catholics erupted. The war ended with the execution of the King, the temporary abolition of the monarchy and the establishment of a republic in England.

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