Tag Archives: Traditional Siberian dress

Yakutia Russia woman costume in 19th century.

Traditional Yakutia Russia costume.  Republic of Sakha clothing.

Yakut woman.

Yakutia Russia woman costume in 19th century.

Femme Yakoute.

Gallery: Asian costumes by Auguste Wahlen. Manners, customs and costumes of all peoples of the world.

Tatar woman from Tomsk Siberia.

Tatar woman costume. Traditional Tomsk Siberia clothing.

Tatar woman from Tomsk. Asia.

Tatar woman from Tomsk Siberia in 19th century.

Femme Tartare de Tomsk. Asie.

Gallery: Asian costumes by Auguste Wahlen. Manners, customs and costumes of all peoples of the world.

Russia Siberia Chukchi family in 19th century.

Traditional Russia costume. Siberia Chukchi family clothing. Tribal Tattoo.

Russia Siberia Chukchi family.

Russia Siberia Chukchi family in 19th century.

Famille Tschiuktsches.

Gallery: Asian costumes by Auguste Wahlen. Manners, customs and costumes of all peoples of the world.

Russians in Siberia. Ethnic groups in 18th century

Solemn Oath. Traditional Russia costumes. Siberia Ethnik dresses

A Tunguzian taking a Solemn Oath

Russians in Siberia. Ethnic groups in 18th century.

A Tunguzian taking a Solemn Oath. Russians Travelling with Dog Sleads in Siberia. Mongolian Lady and Priest. Burattians Hunting.

From the book: ‘Navigantium atque Itinerantium Bibliotheca’, or ‘A Complete Collection of Voyages and Travels’ by John Harris’s. Commissioned under King George II of England, published in London, 1745.

Russia Samoyeds, Nenets costume in 19th century.

Russia, Siberia Samoyeds, Traditional Nenets costume, Nomadic clothing

Russia Samoyeds.

Russia Samoyeds, Nenets costume in 19th century.

Samoyèdes.

Continue reading

Back Figure of a Yakutan Girl, Sakha traditional folk dress.

Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

Back Figure of a Yakutan Girl.

Back Figure of a Yakutan Girl, Sakha traditional folk dress 1803.

Front Figure of a Yakutan Girl

Une Fille Yakoute, par derrière.

THE most learned and revered of the Yakutan Aiouns, or priests, are those who can remember the names of the greatest number of divinities; but they are more indebted for the consideration they enjoy to their powers of magic, their tambour, and the oddity of their dress, than to their sacerdotal functions. Continue reading

Back Figure of a Yakut, Sakha in his Hunting Dress.

Yakut in his Hunting Dress. Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

Back Figure of a Yakut in his Hunting Dress.

Back Figure of a Yakut, Sakha in his Hunting Dress 1803.

Front of of a Yakut, Sakha in his Hunting Dress.

Un Yakout en Habit de Chasse, par derriére.

ALTHOUGH the Yakuti are condemned to a wandering state of existence, they rarely change their winter habitations: in autumn they return to the same huts which they occupied during the preceding winter. Continue reading

A Yakutan Girl, Sakha in traditional folk dress 1803.

A Female Yakut garb. Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

A Yakutan Girl.

A Yakutan Girl, Sakha in traditional folk dress 1803.

Back figure of a Yakutan Girl.

Une Fille Yakoute.

SHAMANISM is the only religion known to the Yakuti. They acknowledge two superior beings; both of them nearly equal in power, the one good, and the other bad. Inferior deities, emanating from their substance, participate also of their qualities. They marry, and have children of both sexes; who, in their turn, produce other divinities, inhabiting the air, the earth, and the waters. Continue reading

A Female Yakut in traditional folk dress 1803.

A Female Yakut garb. Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

A Female Yakut.

 

A Female Yakut, Sakha in traditional folk dress 1803.

Sakha (Yakutia) Republic.

Une Femme Yakoute.

THE dress of the Yakutan women resembles that of the man; but, in general, their garments are better worked, and more loaded with ornaments. When they wish to appear in their best attire, they throw over their usual dress a waistcoat without sleeves, about six inches shorter than their under garment. Continue reading

A Yakut, Sakha in his Hunting Dress 1803.

Yakut Hunting Dress. Sakha traditional folk dress. Traditional Russian national costume

A Yakut in his Hunting Dress.

Yakut in hunting costume 1803. Costume of the Russian empire.

Back Figure of a Yakut, Sakha in his Hunting Dress 1803.

Un Yakout en Habit de Chasse, par derriére.

THE Yakuti call themselves Zokha or Socha. They formerly occupied the upper part oldie river Lena; but, oppressed and persecuted by the Mongols, they followed the course of that river, and descended lower down, till they reached the rigorous climate which they now inhabit. They extend on both sides of the Lena, from Vitym to the mouths of that river, and even to the borders of the Frozen Ocean; some of their tribes are still to be met with, towards the eastern extremity of Siberia, on the coasts of the gulph of Pinjinzk, and the shores of the Kolyma In general, their climate is severe; in some places the soil is rocky, and in others marshy, but it is every where incapable of cultivation, and unfavourable to the progress of population.
The Yakuti are of the middling stature. In their features and manners they resemble both the Mongols and Tartars. Their language has a stronger affinity to the latter; notwithstanding which, it is easy, from a number of expressions, to discover that they are no strangers to the Mongols, and that, formerly, they were in habits of intercourse with the Tongusians The Yakuti are rather flat-nosed, with small eyes, thin brown hair, and light beards. They have no great extent of capacity, but sufficient for their necessities and mode of living. Incapable of a strong degree of attention to any one object, arising more from indifference than idleness, they possess that indolence which moderate desires naturally inspire. Plain, but not rude, in their ordinary intercourse with each other, they possess that politeness which nature bestows, which art cannot teach, and which true benevolence can alone dictate.

The Yakuti form a numerous people, and are divided into tribes and districts. About the middle of the last century, their population was estimated at thirty-five thousand souls; but from the want of correctness in the registers, it may fairly be presumed, that they amounted to triple that number, and that the state of peace which they have enjoyed since that period must have considerably increased their population.
The Yakuti are hunters, pastors, and fishermen: their soil, which is every where unfriendly to cultivation, will never permit them to rise above those primitive occupations of man. Where the chase is unfavourable they are more successful in their fisheries, and the districts that leave unrewarded the fatigues of the hunter and fisherman, generally prove friendly to the vigilance of the pastor.

Gallery: Costume of the Russian empire by Edward Harding.