Category: Regency period

Fashion and costumes of the English Regency period between 1795 and 1837. The transition between “Georgian” and “Victorian” eras. In France the transition from the late Directory to The Napoleonic First Empire era 1804 to 1814, Restoration period 1814 to 1830 (Romantic period, German Biedermeier).

Don Juan. Lord Byron’s Haidée. English Romanticism, the black romance.

Black romance. Lord Byron, Don Juan. Haidée. Romanticism.

“Haidée,
The greatest heiress of the Eastern isles;
So very beautiful was she,
Her dowry was as nothing to her smiles:
Still in her teens, and like a lovely tree
So grew to womanhood.
English Romanticism, the black romance.

Naples hat. Straw, cornette, crepe hats, 1816.

Regency hat fashion. Cornette. Costume Parisien. Empire fashion, Restoration.

Naples hat. Straw, cornette, crepe hats. Romantic era 1816. Related Posts:Crepe dresses 1832. Romanticism fashion.Bonnet de blonde. Headdresses parisien 1830.Costume Robe de Velours. Chapeau de Velours. Support and Seduction: The… Read More

The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World Paperback – December 7, 2021
by Virginia Postrel (Author)

From Neanderthal string to 3D knitting, an “expansive” global history that highlights “how textiles truly changed the world” (Wall Street Journal)

Literature

Couture: then and now Clothes define people. A person's clothing, whether it's a sari, kimono, or business suit, is an essential key to his or her culture, class, personality, or even religion. The Kyoto Costume Institute recognizes the importance of understanding clothing sociologically, historically, and artistically.


Fashion in the Reigns of Louis XVIII and Charles X. Restoration.

fashion history, romantic, victorian, Restoration, Leg-of-mutton, sleeves, Bonnets,

Importation of foreign fashions in 1815 — White dresses, white feathers, and fleurs de lys — Emigrant ladies — Russian toques — Male and female dressmakers — Ruchings — Short sleeves and long gloves — Herbault’s bonnets — “Chefs” — Anglomania in 1815 — Green gauze veils; spencers — The “canezou”— Lacroix, the stay-maker — Dr. Pelletan and Charles X. — Wasps — The “Ourika” fashions — The famous leg-of-mutton sleeves — Fashions “a l’Ipsiboé,” “au Trocadéro,” and “à la Dame Blanche” — Blonde caps and turbans — Head-dresses — Fashions “à la giraffe;” “the last sigh of Jocko” — Female book-keepers; shopwomen — The Cafe des Mille-Colonnes.

Fashions under the First Empire. Reign of Napoleon I. 1804 to 1814.

Regency, Empire, fashion history

Fashions under the First Empire — Sacks — “Personnes cossues” — A saying of Napoleon’s – White gowns — Valenciennes lace — Ball dresses; walking dresses — Polish “toquets” and bonnets — Turbans — Muslins — Artificial flowers — Wenzel’s manufactory; “The Offspring of Imposture,” Campenon’s verses — Parisian ladies, as sketched by Horace Vernet — Stays — Cashmeres — Protest by Piis — Ternaux assists in establishing the manufacture of cashmere shawls in France — Cotton stuffs — Richard Lenoir; importance of the Rouen manufacture — Violets during the Hundred Days — The “eighteen folds,” and white silk.

The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World Paperback – December 7, 2021
by Virginia Postrel (Author)

From Neanderthal string to 3D knitting, an “expansive” global history that highlights “how textiles truly changed the world” (Wall Street Journal)

The Age of Undress by Amelia Rauser.

Dress in the Age of Jane Austen by Hilary Davidson.

Jane Austen at Home by Lucy Worsley