Atta Troll. A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Heinrich Heine.

Heinrich Heine, Atta Troll, German, Romantic,
“Atta Troll. A Midsummer Night’s Dream” by Heinrich Heine

Atta Troll.

“Atta Troll. A Midsummer Night’s Dream” is a narrative poem by Heinrich Heine, which was written in 1841 and 1843 appeared in the newspaper for the elegant world – incomplete and never completes. Atta Troll is one of the most virtuosic works Heines.

Atta Troll addressed as Franz Kafka’s “A Report to an Academy” (short story publ. 1917) by way of dancing bears life the human will to freedom and provides the lazy humans to an untamed bear hero.

ALMOST all the day I lingered
With the children, and we chatted
Like old friends. They fain would ask me,
Who I was and what my business.

“Dear young friends, my native country
Is called Germany,” I told them;
“Bears are found there in abundance,
And my business is bear-bunting;”


When I took my leave, around me
Danced the pretty little beings
In a rondo, while thus sang they:
“Girofflino! Girofflette!“

Heine’s ” Atta Troll” (Browning’s translation ).

Source: Character sketches of romance, fiction and the drama by Rev. Ebenezer Cobham Brewer, 1892. A revised American edition of the readers handbook. Edited by Marion Harland.

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