The Roman Paenula. The cowl or hood. Traveling cloak.

Roman, Paenula, Pattern, cowl, hood
How the Paenula was worn

The Roman Paenula.

The cowl or hood. Ancient roman traveling cloak.

The Paenula was a bell-shaped garment, worn in inclement weather. In most cases it was closed all round, but occasionally it was left open down the front. When it was closed all round it had to be lifted at the sides in order to allow free movement of the arms.

Roman, Paenula, Pattern, cowl, hood
Roman Paenula. The cowl or hood.

As a rule it had a hood attached to it. (1) It had an opening at the breast which was fastened at the top with a pin. The hood was joined to the garment round the neck, and the flaps were probably sewn down to the edges of the breast opening. The paenula was usually made of tightly woven, rough woollen stuff, but sometimes of soft leather.

1 – There were numerous small variations in the cut of the paenula. Occasionally it had no hood. Sometimes it was the same length all round, sometimes it was shortened at the sides. The back sometimes ran down to a point, and sometimes this point was rounded off, and so on.

Related

Roman Clothing and Fashion by Alexandra Croom.

In this richly illustrated survey, Alexandra Croom describes the range and style of clothing worn throughout the Western Empire and shows how fashions changed between the first and the sixth centuries.

Note:  Roman Republic. Senator in the toga. A commoner in the paenula.

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