Costume design by Marie-Louise Bruyère in 1950s.

Costume, Marie-Louise Bruyère, French, Haute couture, vintage, fashion,
Costume design “Modèle Domino”

Costume design by French couturier Marie-Louise Bruyère.

Marie-Louise Bruyère (1918-1958), called Mme Bruyère (pronounced Broo-yair) was born in rural France, but her ambitious parents, Henri Bruyère and Jeanne Loubet, moved the family to the expanding suburbs of Paris, where they prospered.

Costume, Marie-Louise Bruyère, French, Haute couture, vintage, fashion,
Costume design “Modèle Classicisme”

The sophisticated neighbourhood of Saint Gratien, which included Napoleon I’s niece, Princess Mathilde, amongst its residents, impressed the young designer who trained first with the house of Cheruit, and then Lanvin. Madame Jeanne Lanvin asked her to become Première d’Atelier de Couture. By 1928, she opened her own fashion house, Bruyère Couture, which flourished as her fame spread internationally, allowing her to open a grand salon at 22 Place Vendome in 1937. She staged two fashion shows a year, containing up to 200 different outfits in cool raffish elegance.

Costume, Marie-Louise Bruyère, French, Haute couture, vintage, fashion,
Costume design “Modèle Olympic”

Each outfit was assigned a different name. By 1947 she employed 328 people. The business continued to grow in scale and reputation, but from the mid 1950s it switched to producing prêt-a-porter outfits, and its name became increasingly eclipsed.

Illustration, damasks, ornament
Note:  Callot Model of Chiffon and Taffeta. Paris Spring Season 1913.

Leave a Reply

The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World Paperback – December 7, 2021
by Virginia Postrel (Author)

From Neanderthal string to 3D knitting, an “expansive” global history that highlights “how textiles truly changed the world” (Wall Street Journal)

Literature

Couture: then and now Clothes define people. A person's clothing, whether it's a sari, kimono, or business suit, is an essential key to his or her culture, class, personality, or even religion. The Kyoto Costume Institute recognizes the importance of understanding clothing sociologically, historically, and artistically.