Category Archives: 1913

French haute couture costumes in 1913. Art deco period fashion.

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913

Traditional Maori Poi Dance. New Zealand folk costumess

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913

Maori Poi Dance, New Zealand 1913.

“Poi” as an art form originated in the Māori in New Zealand. The origin of Poi itself is relatively little studied, mainly because oral traditions are known. The Ur-Poi were an invention of Maori women and consisted of two equally long branches that were connected at their ends with flax. The other ends are put into the fire and brought it to burn in order to achieve an effect in the dark. The Poi dance was originally used by the Maori women to maintain flexibility of their hands, and of the men in order to promote the necessary strength and coordination in a fight. Poi were also used as a training tool for other ancient weapons like Mere or Patu. Poi spinning is kinesthetic related to staff rotation or pen spinning, since crossing the manipulation of a rotating object to be kinetic center, stands in front of and adjacent to both sides of the body and not on throwing and catching objects. The traditional Poi game is about a thousand years old and is regarded by the descendants of the original inhabitants of New Zealand today as a cultural tradition.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Māori Wahine New Zealand

Māori Wahine costumes. kiwi feathers. pendent heitiki. Traditional New Zealand dress

Māori Wahine 1913

Māori Wahine, New Zealand 1913.

Māori Wahine (The Māori word for woman) with mat of kiwi feathers and pendent heitiki.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

The Ducal Haka, Rotorua. New Zealand 1913.

Māori warriors wearing piu-pius of flax, performing the Poi dance

The Ducal Haka, Rotorua. New Zealand 1913

The Ducal Haka, Rotoroa Island. New Zealand 1913.

Māori warriors wearing piu-pius of flax, and equipped as for battle performing the Poi dance, stick games and the “haka” war dance. One section wearing alternately red and white dresses, and another wearing hukareres, or blouses, of snowy-white blue sashes and piu-pius round the waist.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Maori warrior with Taiaha weapon, New Zealand

New Zealand warrior tribe. indigenous people costume. Taiaha weapons

Maori warrior with taiaha weapon, New Zealand 1913

Maori warrior with Taiaha weapon, New Zealand

The Taiaha (also called Hani) is mace and spear of New Zealand’s indigenous people, the Māori. The Taiaha was developed by the Māori as a melee weapon. Is taught in the handling Mau Rakau, the māori martial arts. The Taiaha grounds contain hardwood and is divided into three parts: arero (hammer head) with the upoko (head, shock tip) and the tinana or ate. The shaft (handle) is round in cross section. At one end it has a spear-shaped leaf (arero) and at the other end a broad impact head (ate, tinana). The spear tip is made of wood and decorated. The impact head end is wider from the middle of flat and round up to the end. This end is cut straight and is similar to a boat paddle. This end is used for pounding, to stab the other. The flip side flat and the tip or tongue (arero) are elaborately decorated with carvings, as an ornamental deposits (for eyes) are occasionally New Zealand Paua abalone snail (Haliotis iris). Below the tip of a wreath of hair is attached.  The length of the Taiaha is about 150 cm (rarely longer). There are occasional variants in which a spearhead of jade was used.

From the book: Picturesque New Zealand (1913) by Paul Gooding. Photography by Muir & Moodie; and Josiah Martin.

Art nouveau illustration by Hede von Trapp.

Fantasy oriental costume. Art nouveau illustration. Painter Hede von Trapp.

” The Broken String of Beats ” by Hede von Trapp.

” The Broken String of Beats “. Art nouveau illustration by Hede von Trapp 1910s.

Hede von Trapp 1877-1947 was an Austrian poet, painter and graphic artist of the Art Nouveau. The majority of the artistic work of Hede von Trapp consists of literary works. She initially worked exclusively as an author and poet. Her graphic oeuvre is mostly closely thematically related to its literature. Often to play female characters who fight against social conventions, a central role.

Nala and Damayanti. Indian myth and legend.

Damayanti and the Swan. Indian myth and legend. Traditional Indian clothing. Indian epic Mahabharata

Damayanti and the Swan

Nala and Damayanti. Indian myth and legend.

Content
A Noble Prince and Fair Princess — Swan Messengers of Love—A Royal Romance — The Love-sick Maiden — Indra and the Rishis — The Swayamvara—Gods Descend from Heaven—Nala’s Mission—Interview with Damayanti — A Faithful Lover—Gathering of Rajahs—Gods Rejected by Damayanti — The Choice of Nala—Wedding Gifts of the Gods — The Royal Marriage — Kali the Demon—Plot to Ruin Nala.

Once upon a time there reigned in Nishadha (The south-eastern division of Central India.) a great rajah of choicest virtues whose name was Nala. He had great skill in taming steeds; he was a peerless archer, and was devoted to truth. Nala commanded a mighty army: like to the sun was his splendor, and he was exalted over all other kings as is the monarch of the gods. He had withal great piety, and he was deeply read in the Vedas, but he was ever a passionate lover of dice. Many a high-born lady spoke his praises, for he was generous of heart, and self-controlled, and the guardian of law. Indeed, Nala was a very present Manu (An incarnation of Manu, the first lawgiver). Continue reading