Fleming, English and German Princely costumes

German nobles. 17th century clothing. Baroque fashion. German soldiers uniforms. Fleming Princely.

First half of the 17th Century costumes.

Fleming, English and German Princely costumes.

First half of the 17th Century. Baroque era.

Top row left: German Princely Costumes (1625-1640) Right: German soldiers. (1630-1650) Bottom row left to right: English (1638-1640) Fleming (1640-1650) Right: German nobles (1625-1640).

Source: On the history of costumes. Münchener Bilderbogen. Edited by Braun and Schneider 1860.

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  1. Reigns of Henri IV. and Louis XIII. 1589 to 1643.
  2. Reign of Louis XIV. 1643 to 1715
  3. Reign of Louis XV. 1715 to 1774.
  4. Reign of Louis XVI. 1774 to 1780.
  5. Reign of Louis XVI. 1780 to 1789.
  6. Madame de Pompadour. Her political power and general influence.
  7. The Entry of Louis XIV and Maria Theresa into Arras 1667.
  8. The Coronation Banquet of Louis XV at Reims 1722.
  9. Costumes Louis XV era. Rococo fashion 1720-1740.
  10. English style in the Reign of Louis XIV
  11. The Corset and the Crinolin.
  12. Italian Lace History. Reference List of Italian Laces.
  13. On the history of costumes. From Ancient to the 19th century
  14. Ladies hat styles from 1776-1790 by Rose Bertin.
  15. The Salons of Paris before the French Revolution 1786-1789.
  16. The Evolution of Modern Feminine Fashion 1786.
  17. Caraco a´la francaise in 1786.
  18. Fashion in Paris and London, 1780 to 1788.
  19. The French Republic 1789 to 1804.
  20. Reign of Napoleon I. 1804 to 1814.
Note:  Costumes of the late 17th century. French and German nobility.

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