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Followed by millions of people from all over the world, master armor maker Svetlana Quindt aka "Kamui Cosplay" will help you bring your cosplay dreams to life with your own two hands! Kamui Cosplay deconstructs the work that goes into making a complete costume, from the first thought to the final photo. Tutorials cover design planning, fabricating body armor, 3D painting techniques and more.

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Clotilde princess of Burgundy.

Clotilde. Merovingian costumes. Medieval, 5th century clothing. Saint Clotilde Chrodechild

Saint Clotilde woman of King Clovis I.

Clotilde princess of Burgundy.

Medieval Merovingian Frankish Queen.


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Clotilde or Chrodechild (475–545), princess of Burgundy, was the second wife of Merovingian Frankish king Clovis I  (Salian Frankish dynasty), and by this marriage, Queen of the Franks. She confessed to Catholicism and contributed to the decision in Clovis, also accept this form of Christianity.


After the death of Clovis in 511 she founded monasteries and churches. She became, like her husband and her daughter buried in the Church of the Apostles in Paris, the later church of Sainte-Geneviève.


Saint Clothilde as she is honored as patroness of women and notaries. She is often represented with a model of the church and a book, donating the poor. Her celebration is the 3rd June. Clotilde is revered as sacred by the Church.

Source: Modes et Costumes Historiques.  Edited by Hippolyte Louis Emile and Polidor Jean Charles Pauquet. Published by Cassell, Petter & Galpin London, 1864

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