Tag: Flapper

In the 1920s, the term designated Flapper, someone who flutters, young women who wore short skirts and short hair, listened to Jazz and confidently put in Scene contrary to the prevailing morality. The Flapper were considered naughty and immoral because they wore make-up, hard alcohol drinking and smoking. As a possible model for the type of the flapper, the independent young woman, the Gibson Girl applies. Although there is between the Gibson Girl and the Flapper no outward similarity, but were for the Gibson Girl independence and self-confident femininity typical.

Auguste Racinet. The Costume History Hardcover – Illustrated, November 4, 2015
by Françoise Tétart-Vittu (Author)

Racinet's Costume History is an invaluable reference for students, designers, artists, illustrators, and historians; and a rich source of inspiration for anyone with an interest in clothing and style.

The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World Paperback – December 7, 2021
by Virginia Postrel (Author)

From Neanderthal string to 3D knitting, an “expansive” global history that highlights “how textiles truly changed the world” (Wall Street Journal)

Literature

Couture: then and now Clothes define people. A person's clothing, whether it's a sari, kimono, or business suit, is an essential key to his or her culture, class, personality, or even religion. The Kyoto Costume Institute recognizes the importance of understanding clothing sociologically, historically, and artistically.


Fashion Nostalgie by Mag-Helly.

Créations de Couturiers Mag-Helly and Joseph Magnin. Art deco costumes. Flapper fashion Model of Nostalgie - Mascotte. French 1920s clothing.

Créations de Couturiers Mag-Helly and Joseph Magnin. Les créations parisiennes Paris 1929. Related Posts:Model of “Pomme d’Api” by couturier Riva.Créations de Joseph Magnin and Rolande.Créations de Couturiers Drecoll-Beer and Redfern,… Read More

The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World Paperback – December 7, 2021
by Virginia Postrel (Author)

From Neanderthal string to 3D knitting, an “expansive” global history that highlights “how textiles truly changed the world” (Wall Street Journal)