Mourning dresses. August 1794. Robes of black taffeta.

The Age of Undress by Amelia Rauser.

Dress in the Age of Jane Austen by Hilary Davidson.

Jane Austen at Home by Lucy Worsley 


Regency, Gallery, Fashion, costumes, Mourning, dresses, Jane Austen
Mourning Dresses August 1794

The Gallery of Fashion. August 1794.

Regency mourning dresses 1794. Robe and petticoat of black taffeta.

FIG, XIX. A Lady in mourning.

Head dress composed of six yards of black and white cross-striped crape-gauze, formed into a twisted turban, and finishing behind in a long veil, trimmed with a fringe of bugles. The toupée and side curls lightly frizzed and intermixed with the turban; the hair behind thrown into ringlets. One white ostrich and one black heron feather placed on the right side. Robe and petticoat of black taffeta; long sleeves, with short loose sleeves over them; the whole trimmed with bugle fringe. Crape handkerchief within the robe. One string of large black heads round the neck, and black ear-rings of the same. Black gloves, fan, and shoes.

FIG. XX. A Lady in half-mourning

Head-dress: white chip hat bound with black, and trimmed with a piece of black silk; two black leathers placed on the right side, near the front. The toupée combed straight, and the hair behind in ringlets. Pierrot and petticoat of clear white lawn; short sleeves, with full half sleeves, trimmed with narrow love riband; the petticoat embroidered and trimmed in black. Full plaiting of lawn round the neck, tied in the front with love riband. Sash of broad love riband tied on the left side. Two strings of black beads round the neck. Ear-rings of the same. Grey gloves. White shoes, trimmed with black.

Source: THE GALLERY OF FASHION Vol. 1,. April 1794 to March 1795. Published by Nikolaus von Heideloff, London. 

The Age of Undress by Amelia Rauser.

Dress in the Age of Jane Austen by Hilary Davidson.

Jane Austen at Home by Lucy Worsley 


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