Indian embroidered satin stuff for dresses. Treasury of ornamental art.

Textil design,Satin, Embroidery, India, specimen
India. Embroidered Satin.

INDIAN EMBROIDERED SATIN STUFFS FOR DRESSES.

Museum of Ornamental Art.

THESE beautiful fabrics are embroidered by hand on grounds respectively of amber and black satin. They were manufactured at Cutch. In the specimen on the yellow ground it will be observed, that the flowers and leaves of the diaper pattern and border are all edged or outlined with black, whereby an increased richness and depth of tint is obtained, whilst the pattern is, at the same time, more forcibly detached from the ground.

The reverse of this expedient is generally observable in diaper patterns when the ground is of a dark colour; in the latter case, the very constant rule is to surround the forms of’ the pattern with a white or lighter coloured outline. In either method the result is to give additional clearness of tint and greater general effect to the pattern.

Source: The treasury of ornamental art, illustrations of objects of art and vertù by Sir John Charles Robinson. Marlborough House (London, England), 1858.

Note:  Italian embroidered silk hangings. The treasury of ornamental art. 16th c.

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