Promenade dress. London Regency fashion 1824.

Rudolph Ackermann, Regency, London, fashion, Promenade dress, costume,
London fashions 1824. Promenade dress.

London fashion 1824. Promenade dress.

Pelisse of levantine silk, or Terry velvet, of a rich brown colour (couleur d’oreille d’ours), made plain and high to fasten in front, with a neat standing collar, edged with satin of the same colour. The velvet (velours epingle), which promises to be very fashionable this winter, has not been worn for many years: it looks like very narrow’ cords, and forms elegant trimmings for silk pelisses: the ceinture, which fastens with a gold buckle in front, and the leaves and knots of the trimming, are made of it.

The trimming is scolloped, and edged with satin, having a pair of leaflets introduced at each point through a slit, which is bound with satin, and reunited with a velvet knot behind the leaves. The corsage is ornamented from the shoulder to the waist, where the trimming approximates, and widens again in descending, till it reaches the ermine which goes round the bottom of the pelisse, and is a quarter of a yard in depth.

The long sleeve has a full epaulette, ornamented with leaves, and the wrist is trimmed to correspond. Bonnet of the same material as the pelisse, lined with the same, and the inside edged with shaded velvet, rather more than an inch broad : the front a la Marie Stuart; the crown round, and rather low, ornamented with velvet flowers and bows of shaded velvet.

Bonnet cap of Honiton, with very full borders fastening under the chin. Fulllace ruff and ruffles. Terry velvet boots, the colour of the pelisse. Pale yellow gloves, and a shell reticule, with silver chain.

Note:  Habitués of White's. Marquis of Londonderry, Colonel "Kangaroo" Cooke.

Source: The Repository of arts, literature, commerce, manufactures, fashions and politics by Rudolph Ackermann. London: Published by R. Ackermann. Volume 3, 1824.


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