Category: 14th Century

Fashion and Costumes during the 14th century.

Reign of Philip III and Louis VIII. The influence of the Crusaders.

Jerusalem, Crusade, Crusader, middle ages

Severity of feminine costume – Long gowns and gimps – Marguerite of Provence – “Fermaux” – Reappearance of splendor in dress – Eastern customs – The priests of fashion – Haberdashery and peacock-feathers – Female embroiderers – Taste for embroidery – Continual temptations – Earliest sumptuary laws – Furs – St. Louis’s opinion on dress – Prohibitions by Philippe le Bel; speech made by his wife – Crépine.

14th century clothing in Italy. Second half of the XIV century.

Medieval, Italian, 14th century, clothing

14th century clothing in Italy. Second half of the XIV century. Middle ages Burgundian fashion (Hennin, Escoffion, Surcoat, Cotehardie, Cotta). Upper half of the picture:  Admiral of Venice and noble squire.… Read More

The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World Paperback – December 7, 2021
by Virginia Postrel (Author)

From Neanderthal string to 3D knitting, an “expansive” global history that highlights “how textiles truly changed the world” (Wall Street Journal)

Literature

Couture: then and now Clothes define people. A person's clothing, whether it's a sari, kimono, or business suit, is an essential key to his or her culture, class, personality, or even religion. The Kyoto Costume Institute recognizes the importance of understanding clothing sociologically, historically, and artistically.


Chapeaux. Les modes du Moyen Age. Costume féminin français.

Chapeaux, mode, Moyen Age, Costume, français

L’histoire du costume féminin français. Les modes du Moyen Age, de l’an 1037 à l’an 1461. Chapeaux. Escoffion, Chapeau breton, Collier, Hénin, Banniere des Chapeliers, Chapeau d’élégante.

The Fabric of Civilization: How Textiles Made the World Paperback – December 7, 2021
by Virginia Postrel (Author)

From Neanderthal string to 3D knitting, an “expansive” global history that highlights “how textiles truly changed the world” (Wall Street Journal)