State Coat of Brocade by Buland Baksh and Ahmed Khan of Alwar.

Maharaja, State, Coat, Brocade, India, Rajasthan
Front view of a coat of brocade (kincob or kamkhwab, cloth of gold) of zig-zag pattern in red and gold.
Rajasthan, Maharaja, state, brocade, overcoat
Embroidered coat. The back view of the State Coat of Brocade.

State Coat of Brocade ca. 1740.

View of a coat of brocade (kincob or kamkhwab, cloth of gold) of zig-zag pattern in red and gold . The borders and shoulder and back pieces are of black velvet embroidered in an elaborate floral pattern with gold thread, pearls, rubies and emeralds, by Maharaja Buland Baksh and Ahmed Khan of Ulwar (todays Alwar).

Cost of velvet and brocade, 90 rupees; of the lining of light blue satin, 11 rupees; of the jewels, 5000 rupees; and labour, 300 rupees; total, 5401 rupees. Length down the middle seam of the back, 32 inches. Regal garments of this kind were, no doubt, worn at the Imperial Court, whence came most of the best workmen at Ulwar.

Source:

  • Indian Jewellery by Thomas Holbein Hendley. Journal of Indian Art, 1909.
  • Ulwar and its art treasures by Thomas Holbein Hendley. London: W. Griggs 1888.

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