Hunkpapa Sioux chief “No Neck” who surrendered with Crazy Horse.

Indian chief “No Neck”. Hunkpapa Sioux.

No Neck, a Hunkpapa Sioux who surrendered with Crazy Horse in 1877. He wearing an eagle feather bonnet with trailer, a bone hairpipe breastplate, a U.S. Grant peace medal and holding a pipe and stem.

The pipe stem is finely carved with the heads of a big horn ram, an elk, a buffalo, and a turtle.

The Hunkpapa or Húŋkpapȟa (formerly often rendered as Honkpapa) are a North American Indian tribe and belong to the Lakota of the Sioux language family. The name Hunkpapa refers to the camp circle and means at the entrance or head of the circle, because the tribe traditionally had its place at the entrance to the camp circle.

The Hunkpapa form one of seven Lakota tribes, while the other six tribes consist of the Brulé, Minneconjou, Oglala, Sans Arc, Sihasapa and Two Kettles. Their former tribal territory was in northwestern South Dakota, where, like almost all Indians on the Great Plains, they lived by hunting buffalo and lived in tipis.

They were particularly closely related to the Sihasapa. The Hunkpapa, Sihasapa and Sans Arc inhabited almost the same area, which extended north to the Little Missouri and south to the Cheyenne River.

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Note:  James Graham, 1. Marquess of Montrose.

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